Day-After Thanksgiving Soup [with Turkey Carcass]
Save leftover turkey carcass and savor every last bit of Thanksgiving with this delicious turkey carcass soup. Accompanied by cereals, beans and hearty veggies, this turkey soup is the perfect Thanksgiving meal for the day after Thanksgiving that the whole family can enjoy! How's that for a title? Seeing the word "carcass" in your recipe […]

Save leftover turkey carcass and savor every last bit of Thanksgiving with this delicious turkey carcass soup. Accompanied by cereals, beans and hearty veggies, this turkey soup is the perfect Thanksgiving meal for the day after Thanksgiving that the whole family can enjoy!

How's that for a title? Seeing the word "carcass" in your recipe probably isn't the most appetizing, but I swear this turkey carcass soup is simply delicious and great for your leftover Thanksgiving turkey. Speaking of Thanksgiving, things are going to be a little different here this year. I'll be alone with Curt and my mother-in-law but we'll make a little turkey and I'll make the most of my leftovers! This soup and this turkey and cranberry salad are my go-tos. And let's be realistic, lots of sides !!!

It has been a difficult year for everyone but I encourage you to find a little thing that you are grateful for. Even if it's not a big party or a big party, take a moment to think about the little things that make you happy, IT'S Thanksgiving! And if all else fails, make a turkey, then make this soup. You will not regret it!

Why cook your turkey carcass?

Okay so let's talk about saving your turkey carcass. There are several reasons you will want to reuse it:

  1. There is still a lot of meat on these bones! Don't let it get lost.
  2. Turkey bones are a delicious and nutritious bone broth that contains incredible benefits including collagen and immune properties. Your grandmother was onto something with her chicken soup - the same goes for the turkey!

You can of course just clean your turkey, but I find cooking it in soup helps release some of the meat that gets stuck on the bones. Plus, the turkey carcass soup is delicious!

How to make turkey carcass soup

This turkey soup requires two main steps, but otherwise it's super simple! The first step is to cook the turkey carcass in water to free the meat from the bones and infuse your water with all the goodness of turkey for a delicious turkey bone broth. You can of course stop here or you can skip to the second step where you add vegetables, grains and beans to make a hearty meal in one. Here is the full list of ingredients:

  • Turkey carcass (any size is fine!)
  • Water, for stock
  • Apple cider vinegar (this helps the bones release their collagen in the broth)
  • Onion
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Grains (I like farro, barley or wild rice) - hearty grains work best or they will get too mushy!
  • Beans (optional, but white or lima beans taste better!)
  • Spices - I love the sage and poultry seasoning, but this is where you can play and make your own turkey soup

* For full instructions, scroll to Recipe.

I wanted to answer a few questions that I know this turkey soup:

Can you freeze your turkey carcass?

Yes! If you don't have time after Thanksgiving (or any other occasion that requires turkey!), You can place your turkey carcass in a bag and tie up before putting it in the freezer. You can freeze your turkey carcass for up to 6 months. When you are ready to make your turkey soup, simply place the frozen turkey carcass directly into the pot. No need to thaw!

Can you make this Turkey Carcass Soup in the Instant Pot?

Yes! I tested this recipe both on the stovetop and Instant pot. The only problem with the Instant Pot is space, but if you've made a smaller turkey this year, you absolutely can make this recipe in the Instant Pot. Here are the instructions:

Place the turkey carcass in the instant pot and top with water until completely covered. Set Instant Pot to the “soup” setting and set the time to 25 minutes. Leave a slow release for about 20 minutes, then quickly release the remaining time. Remove and filter the carcass and once cool, separate the turkey meat from the bones.

Return the broth to Instant Pot and add the vegetables, turkey meat, grains and beans. Set to the “soup” setting and cook for 10 minutes before making a quick release. Your turkey carcass soup will be good to go!

Can you use a chicken carcass instead of turkey?

Yes! You most certainly can. Be sure to save your chicken carcasses after roasting a whole chicken to make delicious chicken carcass soup. Right under the chicken for the turkey and keep everything else the same. Alternatively, I recommend doing bone broth which you can freeze and use in place of the stock or sip daily to keep your immune system healthy.

Let's get into the recipe!

Impression

Turkey Carcass Soup

Save leftover turkey carcass and savor every last bit of Thanksgiving with this delicious turkey carcass soup. Accompanied by cereals, beans and hearty veggies, this turkey soup is the perfect Thanksgiving meal for the day after Thanksgiving that the whole family can enjoy!

  • Author: Davida lederle
  • Preparation time: 10 minutes
  • Cooking time: 110 minutes
  • Total time: 2 hours
  • Yield: 12 portions (at least!) 1X
  • Category: Soup
  • Method: cook
  • Cooked: American
  • Diet: Gluten free
Ladder

Ingredients

  • 1 turkey carcass (any size will work)
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced
  • 4 chopped carrots
  • 4 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1 cup cereals (I prefer barley, farro or wild rice)
  • 1 can of rinsed and drained beans (white or lima work great)
  • 1 tbsp dried sage
  • 1 tbsp Poultry seasoning
  • 1 tbsp dried thyme
  • 1 1/2 tbsp sea ​​salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • optional: 1 can of green peppers for an extra kick

* the spices should be adjusted according to the soup

  1. Place the turkey carcass in a large pot and cover with water. The amount of water will depend on the size of the carcass
  2. Add the apple cider vinegar and bring to a boil.
  3. Once boiling, lower the heat to simmer and cook for 1 hour.
  4. Turn off the stove and carefully remove the turkey carcass from the pan and place it in a large, shallow dish.
  5. Once the turkey carcass has cooled, remove the meat from the bones and reserve the meat.
  6. Add the onion, carrots, celery, cereals and beans (and chili peppers if using) to the broth and again bring the mixture to a boil before simmering for 30 to 45 minutes or until the grains are well cooked.
  7. Add the turkey meat to the soup and stir in the spices. Adjust the spices to taste.
  8. Cook for another 10 minutes on low heat before serving.
  9. Store up to a week in the refrigerator or several months in the freezer.

Keywords: turkey soup, leftover turkey soup, turkey carcass soup

Do you like this recipe? Here are a few more you might like:

Leftover Turkey Salad with Cranberry Sauce
Detox vegetable soup
The ultimate soup to boost the immune system

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