Lettuce Eat: A Veggie Journey We All Can Take
This is a guest post from Vivian Jibrin. Happy to support his very cool Lettuce Eat project! By Vivian JibrinCompared to most teenagers (I'm 18) my diet is quite nutritious, but I'm the first to admit that I could eat more servings - and types - of fruits and vegetables. I also want to learn […]

This is a guest post from Vivian Jibrin. Happy to support his very cool Lettuce Eat project!

Vivian Jibrin

By Vivian Jibrin
Compared to most teenagers (I'm 18) my diet is quite nutritious, but I'm the first to admit that I could eat more servings - and types - of fruits and vegetables. I also want to learn how to cook more dishes than eggs, fried rice, pasta and brownies!

But how do you get motivated to do that? The answer came to me while researching a subject for my Gold Award - the highest honor a Girl Scout can achieve. I've found that many American teens don't even eat a fruit or vegetable a day! If I can help others
incorporating more vegetables and fruits into their daily meals, while learning why it is so important to do so, would surely inspire me to do the same.
So, I started "Lettuce Eat" which has three basic approaches:

  • A high school club that met once a month, focused on a different fruit or vegetable, like berries or potatoes or dark leafy vegetables. We ate the fruit or vegetable, talked about its nutritional qualities and discussed the recipes. When the coronavirus pandemic hit, I had to adapt quickly to the conditions of social distancing and held my club sessions on the web, after a slight change in approach.
  • Meetings by videoconference with Girl Scouts (aged 7 to 15), to teach them fruits and vegetables in a fun and age-appropriate way. For example, I have developed interactive activities such as a sorting game and a treasure hunt; and I even did some live demos of simple snacks. When I started the project I thought I knew the most important things about nutrition; after all, my aunt is a dietitian! But over the months and as I went deeper into the Gold Award Project, I discovered a lot of new aspects of nutrition and a lot of great tips.

For example:
Did you know that dandelions are wild flowers that you can eat? They have been used in traditional herbal medicine for centuries to treat digestive disorders and more. Truth be told, the leaves can be a bit bitter, but they can be useful in a survival situation.


A tip for the -hater vegetable: sneak the vegetables into meals without having to taste them. This has led me to eat vegetables that I don't like, such as cauliflower or Brussels sprouts. I sautéed chopped vegetables with minced meat to use in lasagna and other dishes (recipe in www.lettuceeat.club).

I learned that I could eat a lot more vegetables at a time by "shrinking" them. For example, I sauté or steam spinach and other vegetables to a fraction of their raw size, which makes it seem like I'm eating less.

My favorite part of cooking was tailoring the dessert recipes. I reduced the amount of added sugar in the recipe and then incorporated more fruits and / or veggies, making the desserts tastier.

Sometimes you don't even need to cook a fancy and elaborate dish, just adding something on the side adds a huge amount to the nutrients you get from the meal. For example, tomatoes contain a lot of vitamin C, and when added to rice and beans, you absorb more iron from the beans and rice.

Another discovery: the germination of super healthy microgreens. I have to say it's really got addicting in my house! Now there are sprouts for breakfast every day - they are excellent on a toast with melted cheese, growing in mason jars and flat (take out) platters. So far we have sprouted sunflower seeds (which taste great), alfalfa seeds (delicious too), mustard seeds (a little spicy), radishes (very spicy but delicious), chia (smoky and bitter - not likely to try them again), and now we're hoping to learn how to germinate sunflower seeds in our own garden.

I think my most useful lesson was the importance of eating “3 square meals” to avoid being tempted by unhealthy snacks. I used to snack on LOTS of Cheerios and yogurt; So much so that I would go into a vicious cycle of eating too much between meals, then not being hungry enough for a healthy meal, then being hungry for a snack again… and that would go on and on. Now I know I'm eating a full meal with healthy veggies, protein, and grains, and eliminated most unhealthy snacks except for a treat every now and then.

These are my findings, and I think my club members and the videoconferencing audience gathered some healthy advice as well. If nothing else, our sessions made everyone a little more aware
what they put on their plates (as well as what they previously lacked). I was surprised how much the kids enjoyed the cooking sessions and live hands-on activities, such as the 'sorting game', where they ducked to the ground when an unhealthy food was called out, or jumped around. and twirls when fruits or vegetables were called.

You can visit the "Games" tab at www.lettuceeat.club for a full description of five different games.


There is so much to learn about nutrition, and so many people don't know it - even some parents and Girl Scout leaders were amazed at how much they learned during the sessions. And although I'm not a nutritionist and only spent about a year on my project, Lettuce-eat has proven to be a fun way to provide useful and accessible information to teens, young children, and to all.


Nutrition is a critical part of health and development. Better alimentation is related to improved infant, child and maternal health, stronger immune systems, safer pregnancy and childbirth, lower risk of non-communicable diseases ( such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease ), and longevity.

Healthy children learn better. People with adequate alimentation are more productive and can create opportunities to gradually break the cycles of poverty and hunger.

Malnutrition, in every form, presents significant threats to human health. Today the world faces a double burden of malnutrition that includes both undernutrition and overweight, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

WHO is providing scientific advice and decision-making tools that can help countries take action to address all forms of malnutrition to support health and wellbeing for all, at all ages.

This fact file explores the risks posed by all forms of malnutrition, starting from the earliest stages of development, and the responses that the health system can give directly and through its influence on other sectors, particularly the food system.

It’s easy to get confused when it comes to health and alimentation. Even qualified experts often seem to hold opposing opinions. Yet, despite all the disagreements, a number of wellness tips are well supported by research. Here are 27 health and alimentation tips that are actually based on good science.

The effective management of food intake and nutrition are both key to good health. Smart alimentation and food choices can help prevent disease. Eating the right foods can help your body cope more successfully with an ongoing illness. Understanding good alimentation and paying attention to what you eat can help you maintain or improve your health.

Food and nutrition are the way that we get mazout, providing energy for our bodies. We need to replace nutrients in our bodies with a new supply every day. Water is an important component of nutrition. Fats, proteins, and carbohydrates are all required. Maintaining key vitamins and minerals are also important to maintaining good health. For pregnant women and adults over 50, vitamins such as vitamin D and minerals such as calcium and iron are important to consider when choosing foods to eat, as well as possible dietary supplements.

A healthy diet includes a lot of natural foods. A sizeable portion of a healthy diet should consist of fruits and vegetables, especially ones that are red, orange, or dark green. Whole céréales, such as whole wheat and brown rice, should also play a part in your diet. For adults, dairy products should be non-fat or low-fat. Protein can consist of lean meat and poultry, seafood, eggs, beans, legumes, and soy products such as tofu, as well as unsalted seeds and nuts.

Good nutrition also involves avoiding certain kinds of foods. Sodium is used heavily in processed foods and is dangerous for people with high blood pressure. The USDA advises adults to consume less than 300 milligrams ( mg ) per day of cholesterol ( found in meat and full-fat dairy products among others ). Fried food, solid fats, and trans fats found in margarine and processed foods can be harmful to heart health. Refined grains ( white flour, white rice ) and refined sugar ( table sugar, high fructose corn syrup ) are also bad for long-term health, especially in people with diabetes. Alcohol can be dangerous to health in amounts more than one serving per day for a woman and two per day for a guy.

Nutrition is a critical part of health and development. Better alimentation is related to improved infant, child and maternal health, stronger immune systems, safer pregnancy and childbirth, lower risk of non-communicable diseases ( such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease ), and longevity.

There are many high-quality, free guidelines available for saine eating orgie that give more details on portion size, total calorie consumption, what to eat more of, and what to eat less of to get healthy and stay that way.

Even if you are getting enough to eat, if you are not eating a balanced diet, you may still be at risk for certain nutritional deficiencies. Also, you may have nutritional deficiencies due to certain health or life conditions, such as pregnancy, or certain medications you may be taking, such as high blood pressure medications. People who have had intestinal diseases or had sections of intestines removed due to disease or weight loss surgery also may be at risk for vitamin deficiencies. Alcoholics are also at high risk of having nutritional deficiencies.

One of the most common nutritional deficiencies is iron deficiency anemia. Your blood cells need iron in order to supply your body with oxygen, and if you don’t have enough iron, your blood will not function properly. Other nutritional deficiencies that can affect your blood cells include low levels of vitamin B12, folate, or vitamin C.

Vitamin D deficiency may affect the health of your bones, making it difficult for you to absorb and use calcium ( another mineral that you may not be getting enough of ). Although you can get vitamin D by going out in the sun, many people with concerns about skin cancer may end up with low levels of vitamin D by not getting enough sun.

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