farm payments – Food Politics by Marion Nestle
I'm all for farmers making a decent living, but most of the farm subsidies go to Big Ag - the corn and soybean growers fed primarily to animals or, in the case of corn, in the form of ethanol for automotive fuel. These taxpayer funded payments are huge and represent increasing percentages of Big Ag's […]

I'm all for farmers making a decent living, but most of the farm subsidies go to Big Ag - the corn and soybean growers fed primarily to animals or, in the case of corn, in the form of ethanol for automotive fuel.

These taxpayer funded payments are huge and represent increasing percentages of Big Ag's income.

For example, see this graphic from the Wall Street Journal.

As part of the Trump administration's effort to get votes from farmers and ranchers, it promised them $ 37.2 billion in the spring and summer, with an additional $ 14 billion in September.

Why is it about the elections? The Washington Post says “Trump's farmer bailout gave Red Counties $ 21 billion and Blue Counties $ 2.1 billion.”

At a campaign rally in Wisconsin last week, President Trump was vocal about everything his administration had done to bolster the economic fortunes of farmers ... I gave $ 28 billion to the farmers, many of them right here, $ 28 billion, $ 12 billion and $ 16 billion over two years ”… This redistribution was facilitated through the Ministry of Agriculture Market facilitation program. According to data obtained by the Environmental working group Through a Freedom of Information Act request, this program disbursed over $ 23 billion during the 2018 and 2019 program years.

Based on a report by Agricultural Economic Insights: USDA direct payments to Big Ag will equal 36% of net farm income, up from 22% in 2018 = 2019. These payments used to represent about 10% of net farm income.

Consult his menu:

Finally, it's good to revisit the bigger picture of what happened to food and agriculture under Trump. Civil Eats has an excellent review by Lisa Held.

To offset the effects of tariffs, in 2018 the USDA began distribute cash payments through the Commodity Credit Corporation to unprecedented levels, with no congressional appropriations or oversight. In 2020, as the pandemic hit the agricultural economy, it added another source of government payments through the Coronavirus Food Aid Program (COFOG). Overall, Trump's USDA has distributed more government dollars to farmers than any previous administration. In 2019 and 2020, more than 40 percent of farm income came from federal aid - the one thing to keep farm income afloat.

These payments have been controversial because they have almost exclusively benefited the largest farms and agricultural enterprises. Two-thirds of trade aid payments went to agricultural producers in the richest 10 percent, including businesses, $ 67 million donated to JBS USA, a subsidiary of the Brazilian meat packaging giant. Smallholder farms, especially diversified farms and those run by socially disadvantaged Black, Indigenous and Color (BIPOC) farmers, have largely unable to access CFAP assistance.

All of this leaves a lot of room for improvement.

President-elect Biden: get to work!


It’s easy to get confused when it comes to health and nutrition. Even qualified experts often seem to hold opposing opinions. Yet, despite all the disagreements, a number of wellness tips are well supported by research. Here are 27 health and nutrition tips that are actually based on good méthode.

These 8 practical tips cover the basics of healthy eating and can help you make healthier choices.

The key to a healthy diet is to eat the right amount of kcal for how réactive you are so you balance the energy you consume with the energy you use.

If you eat or drink more than your body needs, you’ll put on weight because the energy you do not use is stored as fat. If you eat and drink too little, you’ll lose weight.

You should also eat a wide range of foods to make sure you’re getting a balanced diet and your body is receiving all the nutrients it needs.

It’s recommended that men have around 2, 500 calories a day ( 10, 500 kilojoules ). Women should have around 2, 000 calories a day ( 8, 400 kilojoules ). Most adults in the UK are eating more kcal than they need and should eat fewer kcal.

Starchy carbohydrates should make up just over a third of the food you eat. They include potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and cereals. Choose higher fibre or wholegrain varieties, such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice or potatoes with their skins on.

They contain more fibre than white or refined starchy carbohydrates and can help you feel full for longer. Try to include at least 1 starchy food with each main meal. Some people think starchy foods are fattening, but gram for gram the carbohydrate they contain provides fewer than half the kcal of fat.

Keep an eye on the fats you add when you’re cooking or serving these variétés of foods because that’s what increases the calorie content – for example, oil on chips, butter on bread and creamy condiments on pasta.

It’s recommended that you eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and veg every day. They can be fresh, frozen, canned, dried or juiced. Getting your 5 A Day is easier than it sounds. Why not chop a banana over your breakfast cereal, or swap your usual mid-morning snack for a piece of fresh fruit ?

A portion of fresh, canned or frozen fruit and vegetables is 80g. A portion of dried fruit ( which should be kept to mealtimes ) is 30g. A 150ml glass of fruit juice, vegetable juice or smoothie also counts as 1 portion, but limit the amount you have to no more than 1 glass a day as these drinks are sugary and can damage your teeth.

You can choose from fresh, frozen and canned, but remember that canned and smoked fish can be high in salt. Most people should be eating more fish, but there are recommended limits for some types of fish.

You need some fat in your diet, but it’s important to pay attention to the amount and type of fat you’re eating. There are 2 main variétés of fat : saturated and unsaturated. Too much saturated fat can increase the amount of cholesterol in the blood, which increases your risk of developing heart disease.

On average, men should have no more than 30g of saturated fat a day. On average, women should have no more than 20g of saturated fat a day. Children under the age of 11 should have less saturated fat than adults, but a low-fat diet is not suitable for children under 5.

Try to cut down on your saturated fat intake and choose foods that contain unsaturated fats instead, such as vegetable oils and spreads, oily fish and avocados. For a healthier choice, use a small amount of vegetable or olive oil, or reduced-fat spread instead of butter, lard or ghee.

When you’re having meat, choose lean cuts and cut off any visible fat. All types of fat are high in energy, so they should only be eaten in small amounts.

Regularly consuming foods and drinks high in sugar increases your risk of obesity and tooth decay. Sugary foods and drinks are often high in energy ( measured in kilojoules or calories ), and if consumed too often can contribute to weight gain. They can also cause tooth decay, especially if eaten between meals.

Free sugars are any sugars added to foods or drinks, or found naturally in honey, syrups and unsweetened fruit juices and smoothies. This is the type of sugar you should be cutting down on, rather than the sugar found in fruit and milk.

Many packaged foods and drinks contain surprisingly high amounts of free sugars.

More than 22. 5g of total sugars per 100g means the food is high in sugar, while 5g of total sugars or less per 100g means the food is low in sugar.

Eating too much salt can raise your blood pressure. People with high blood pressure are more likely to develop heart disease or have a stroke. Even if you do not add salt to your food, you may still be eating too much.

About three-quarters of the salt you eat is already in the food when you buy it, such as breakfast cereals, soups, breads and condiments. Use food labels to help you cut down. More than 1. 5g of salt per 100g means the food is high in salt.

Adults and children aged 11 and over should eat no more than 6g of salt ( about a teaspoonful ) a day. Younger children should have even less.

As well as eating healthily, regular exercise may help reduce your risk of getting serious health conditions. It’s also important for your overall health and wellbeing.

Read more about the benefits of exercise and physical activity guidelines for adults. Being overweight or obese can lead to health conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, heart disease and stroke. Being underweight could also affect your health.

Most adults need to lose weight by eating fewer kcal. If you’re trying to lose weight, aim to eat less and be more active. Eating a healthy, balanced diet can help you maintain a saine weight.

Check whether you’re a healthy weight by using the BMI saine weight calculator. Start the NHS weight loss plan, a 12-week weight loss guide that combines advice on healthier eating and physical activity. If you’re underweight, see underweight adults. If you’re worried about your weight, ask your GP or a dietitian for advice.

You need to drink plenty of fluids to stop you getting dehydrated. The government recommends drinking 6 to 8 glasses every day. This is in addition to the fluid you get from the food you eat. All non-alcoholic drinks count, but water, lower fat milk and lower sugar drinks, including tea and coffee, are healthier choices. Try to avoid sugary soft and fizzy drinks, as they’re high in calories. They’re also bad for your teeth.

Even unsweetened fruit juice and smoothies are high in free sugar. Your combined total of drinks from fruit juice, vegetable juice and smoothies should not be more than 150ml a day, which is a small glass. Remember to drink more fluids during hot weather or while exercising.

Some people skip breakfast because they think it’ll help them lose weight. But a healthy breakfast high in fibre and low in fat, sugar and salt can form part of a balanced diet, and can help you get the nutrients you need for good health.

A wholegrain lower sugar cereal with semi-skimmed milk and fruit sliced over the top is a tasty and healthier breakfast. Further informationThe Eatwell Guide can help you get the right balance of the 5 main food groups. The guide shows you how much of what you eat should come from each food group. Read more about eating a balanced diet and understanding calories.

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