Midwife and Life – CarGo Seat Review
Sharing is loving! Items have been donated Our rather tired car seats needed replacing, so we looked at different styles and decided on one that would also be the easiest to travel. the The CarGo seat is a booster seat which meets UK and European safety standards (ECE R44 / 04) and is also a […]

Sharing is loving!

Items have been donated

Our rather tired car seats needed replacing, so we looked at different styles and decided on one that would also be the easiest to travel. the The CarGo seat is a booster seat which meets UK and European safety standards (ECE R44 / 04) and is also a rolling storage case. The carry handle folds flat then becomes a booster seat and vice versa.

We can't wait to use them when we fly to Portugal next year, Phoebe and Daniel will be using them as hand baggage, then they will be used for our rental car. It was very expensive to add car seat rental to car rental, so they are already saving us money, and we will have the peace of mind that they are following the safety guidelines and were not used only for our own children.

They come in four different colors: blue, pink, green and purple. I went for the classic blue and pink. The kids have tested them on the road and they love the color, the design and of course they are comfortable. Phoebe is delighted to have her own small carry-on for all of her specials. Children must be 125 cm or more to sit in a booster seat and the weight limits are between 22 and 36 kg. You have 10 liters of storage inside the seat - a lot!

You don't have to assemble it, and when you go from a car seat to a luggage you just need a little adjustment, which is easy to do. Here are the booster seats in the car:

In this photo you can see the next step in the transformation, you can see on the pink, the booster arms fold into the seat, which I did on the blue. You can also see the pull handle which you then fold back.

In the photo below you can see the inside of the booster and how much storage space you get. The handle then unfolds so that they can roll their "suitcase". The yellow button is a twist style button that locks the cover in place.

So you can see how it is in action. The cargo seat is manufactured by a small company in the UK. For more information and to check prices, Take a look at their website.

Sharing is loving!


Having a baby is an exciting time that often inspires women to make healthier lifestyle choices and, if needed, work toward a saine body weight. Here you’ll find tips on how to improve your eating and physical activity vêtements while you’re pregnant and after your baby is born.

These tips can also be useful if you’re not pregnant but are thinking about having a baby ! By making changes now, you can get used to new lifestyle habits. You’ll give your baby the best possible start on life and be a healthy example to your family for a lifetime.

Gaining an appropriate amount of weight during pregnancy helps your baby grow to a healthy size. But gaining too much or too little weight may lead to serious health problems for you and your baby.

Talk to your health care professional about how much weight gain is appropriate for you. Work with him or her to set goals for your weight gain. Take into account your age, weight, and health. Track your weight at home or when you visit your health care professional. Don’t try to lose weight if you’re pregnant. Your baby needs to be exposed to healthy foods and low-calorie beverages ( particularly water ) to grow properly. Some women may lose a small amount of weight at the start of pregnancy. Speak to your health care professional if this happens to you.

Consuming healthy foods and low-calorie beverages, particularly water, and the appropriate number of calories may help you and your baby gain the proper amount of weight. How much food and how many kcal you need depends on things such as your weight before pregnancy, your age, and how quickly you gain weight. If you’re at a healthy weight, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( CDC ) External link says you need no extra calories in your first trimester, about 340 extra kcal a day in your second trimester, and about 450 extra calories a day in your third trimester. 1 You also may not need extra calories during the final weeks of pregnancy.

Check with your health care professional about your weight gain. If you’re not gaining the weight you need, he or she may advise you to take in more calories. If you’re gaining too much weight, you may need to cut down on kcal. Each woman’s needs are different. Your needs also depend on whether you were underweight, overweight, or had obesity before you became pregnant, or if you’re having more than one baby.

Does your eating plan measure up ? How can you improve your habits ? Try consuming fruit like berries or a banana with hot or cold cereal for breakfast; a salad with beans or tofu or other non-meat protein for lunch; and a lean serving of meat, chicken, turkey, or fish and steamed vegetables for dinner. Think about new, healthful foods and beverages you can try. Write down your ideas and share them with your health care professional.

A vegetarian eating plan during pregnancy can be healthy. Consider the quality of your eating plan and talk to your health care professional to make sure you’re getting enough calcium, iron, protein, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and other needed nutrients. Your health care professional may also tell you to take vitamins and minerals that will help you meet your needs.

Yes. During pregnancy, you need more vitamins and minerals such as folate, iron, and calcium. Getting the appropriate amount of folate is very important. Folate, a B vitamin also known as folic acid, may help prevent birth defects. Before pregnancy, you need 400 mcg per day from supplements or fortified foods, in addition to the folate you get naturally from foods and beverages. During pregnancy, you need 600 mcg. While breastfeeding, you need 500 mcg of folate per day. 2 Foods high in folate include orange juice, strawberries, spinach, broccoli, beans, fortified breads, and fortified low-sugar breakfast cereals. These foods may even provide 100% of the daily value of folic acid per serving.

Most health care professionals tell women who are pregnant to take a prenatal vitamin every day and consume healthy foods, snacks, and beverages. Ask your doctor about what you should take. What other new habits may help my weight gain ? Pregnancy can create some new food, beverage, and eating concerns. Meet the needs of your body and be more comfortable with these tips. Check with your health care professional with any concerns.

Eat breakfast every day. If you feel sick to your stomach in the morning, try dry whole-wheat toast or whole-grain crackers when you first wake up. Eat them even before you get out of bed. Eat the rest of your breakfast ( fruit, oatmeal, hot or cold cereal, or other foods ) later in the morning.

Eat high-fiber foods. Eating high-fiber foods, drinking water, and getting daily physical activity may help prevent constipation. Try to eat whole-grain cereals, brown rice, vegetables, fruits, and beans.

If you have heartburn, eat small meals spread throughout the day. Try to eat slowly and avoid spicy and fatty foods ( such as hot peppers or fried chicken ). Have drinks between meals instead of with meals. Don’t lie down soon after eating.

Certain foods and drinks can harm your baby if you have them while you’re pregnant. Here’s a list of items you should avoid.

If you were physically active before you became pregnant, you may not need to change your exercise vêtements. Talk with your health care professional about how to change your workouts during pregnancy.

Being physically active can be hard if you don’t have childcare for your other children, haven’t exercised before, or don’t know what to do. Keep reading for tips about how you can work around these hurdles and be physically active.

How can you tell if you’re doing moderate-intensity aerobic activity ? Take the “talk test” to find out. If you’re breathing hard but can still have a conversation easily—but you can’t sing—that’s moderate intensity.

If you can only say a few words before pausing for a breath, that’s called vigorous-intensity activity. If you were in the habit of doing vigorous-intensity aerobic activity or were physically active before your pregnancy, then it’s likely okay for you to continue these activities during your pregnancy.

You can talk to your health care professional about whether to or how to adjust your physical activity while you’re pregnant. If you have health issues such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, or anemia ( too few healthy red blood cells ), ask your health care professional about a level of activity that’s safe for you and your unborn baby.

Go for a walk where you real, in a local park, or in a shopping mall with a family member or friend. If you already have children, take them with you and make it a family outing.

Get up and move around at least once an hour if you sit most of the day. When watching TV or sitting at your computer, get up and move around. Even a simple activity like walking in place can help.

Make a plan to be active while pregnant. List the activities you’d like to do, such as walking or taking a prenatal yoga class. Think of the days and times you could do each activity on your list, such as first thing in the morning, during your lunch break from work, after dinner, or on Saturday afternoon. Look at your calendar or phone or other device to find the days and times that work best and commit to those plans.

For your health and safety, and for your baby’s, you should not do certain physical activities while pregnant. Some of these are listed below. Talk to your health care professional about other physical activities you should not do.

SHOP NOW

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *