Red Curry Dumpling Soup | Fast, Flavorful Soup & Dumplings with Kimchi
This kimchi red curry ball soup is the epitome of a meal that's as tasty and filling as it is quick. With ready-to-eat dumplings and kimchi, it comes together in just fifteen minutes. I often enjoy fresh soups, like this one carrot and lemongrass soup or this gazpacho, during the summer months. But now New […]

This red curry dumpling soup is so tasty and quick!  Made with fully #vegan, ready-to-eat dumplings, it comes together in about 20 minutes.  # vegetarian # vegetarian

An overhead photograph of a hot bowl of red curry dumpling soup, with fresh herbs and kimchi on the side.

This kimchi red curry ball soup is the epitome of a meal that's as tasty and filling as it is quick. With ready-to-eat dumplings and kimchi, it comes together in just fifteen minutes.

I often enjoy fresh soups, like this one carrot and lemongrass soup or this gazpacho, during the summer months. But now New York City is entering fall and it's making me excited for hot soup season.

This curry soup with dumplings is actually a perfect in-between for that time of year when it is possible to have a very chilly morning followed by a hot and sunny afternoon. It is served hot, but requires less simmering than most soup pots. The use of certain pre-made ingredients is what allows it to be ready so quickly.

A bowl of red curry ball soup, made with Nasoya brand kimchi on the side.

Vegan Meal Aid: Nasoya Thai Basil Vegetable Dumplings

While I wish I had the skills to make homemade dumplings, I don't. At least not yet: Lisa tutorial will come to my rescue when it's time to learn!

For now, depend on Nasoya's bio, vegan dumplings. They are completely ready to cook: it only takes a few minutes of cooking to have them on the table. You can prepare them with water or broth, like I do in this recipe. And they're delicious, with an appetizing exterior and a tasty tofu-based filling.

Thanks to the tofu filling, the meatballs contain 6g of vegetable protein per serving. The garnish also contains vegetables (onions, carrots, peas, peppers, carrots), which complement the other vegetables on the dish. I like the texture in the center of the dumplings, which is tender but not mushy - it still has some texture.

Red curry ball soup ingredients

Red curry paste

The meatballs are the star of this soup, but the Thai red curry paste is second. The flavors of most red curry paste products - garlic, lemongrass, red pepper - will complement the flavors of the Nasoya meatballs well.

I'm still learning the differences between flavor profiles of different Thai style curries. Based on my knowledge and experience using green and red curry pastes in recipes, I think either would work in this recipe. I tend to have red curry paste at home more often, so this is what I used here!

A bowl of red curry soup with Nasoya meatballs and kimchi and fresh cilantro on the side.

Kimchi

This red curry dumpling soup gets a flavor and texture punch from Nasoya kimchi. Longtime readers know that I have known this kimchi well! Last fall I had the privilege to travel to Korea to know how Nasoya Kimchi is made. The trip also taught me the history of kimchi and how its culinary origins have become modern traditions.

I sometimes serve kimchi as a condiment, but I also like to fold it into dishes, like this pumpkin porridge or my chickpea salad with crushed kimchi. For this soup, you can either stack your kimchi in a bowl just before eating, or stir the kimchi into the soup in the last minute or two of cooking. It's yours.

Vegetables

I used some of the vegetables that I often keep in my fridge for this soup: onion, red pepper, broccoli. I also added snow peas towards the end, to keep them nice, tender and crunchy. I love how their sweetness complements the salty and spicy flavors of the dish.

You can substitute a few other veg here, including cauliflower, snow peas, green peas, or green beans. Zucchini would also be great. Use what you have.

Coconut milk

Coconut milk is the most suitable source of creaminess in this recipe, as many Thai curries are made with coconut milk or water. It's also a practical choice, as adding it is about as easy as opening a can. If you don't have or prefer not to use coconut milk, you can use my all purpose cashew cream in the red curry and coconut soup.

A bowl of red curry soup, garnished with a generous ball of kimchi.

Store and serve the red curry ball soup

Meatball soup will last up to four days in the refrigerator. I recommend storing everything except the kimchi in an airtight container. The meatballs are strong enough to hold their shape while you are storing the soup, which is great.

You can store the kimchi and any extra toppings, like cilantro or scallions, separately, adding them before you're ready to serve your soup.

An angled photograph of a vegan red curry soup, made from plump plant-based dumplings and topped with a mound of kimchi.

It was actually the first time I had tasted dumplings in a while, maybe even since my trip to Korea last fall. New York has a lot of wonderful places to order plant-based dumplings, but with the shadow of my forties this year, I'm not going out much. It was a treat to eat dumplings at home, with a nourishing and spicy bowl of broth and vegetables.

You can find the full recipe for this red curry dumpling soup, as well as more information on finding Nasoya dumplings near you, at Nasoya website.

Enjoy it and I will be back soon.

xo

This post is sponsored by Nasoya. All opinions are mine. Thanks for your help!


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