Weekly Link Love — Edition 107
Search of the week Diets high in sugar may cause "Persistent" epigenetic changes in an animal's appetite for junk food. Vitamin D improved cognitive function in older people with mild cognitive impairment. Keep sprinting, people. Starchy and sweet foods linked to cavities, especially when eaten as a snack. Convalescent plasma seems to work in COVID […]

Search of the week

Diets high in sugar may cause "Persistent" epigenetic changes in an animal's appetite for junk food.

Vitamin D improved cognitive function in older people with mild cognitive impairment.

Keep sprinting, people.

Starchy and sweet foods linked to cavities, especially when eaten as a snack.

Convalescent plasma seems to work in COVID patients.

New Prime Blueprints Podcasts

Episode 455: Dr. Cheyenne Bryant: Host Elle Russ welcomes Dr. Cheyenne Bryant to talk about health, happiness and community empowerment.

Primal Health Coach Radio Episode 84: Laura and Erin discuss with Dr. Sandra Scheinbaum the importance of having a mission.

Media, Schmedia

It's out.

This Neolithic farmer from Germany had terrible teeth.

Interesting blog posts

is Epicureanism a better alternative to stoicism?

Call your grandma.

Social Notes

To send this to someone who says salt is bad for you.

Beautiful and tragic.

Everything else

Most effective anti-COVID drug in recent analysis? Melatonin.

It must have been a difficult study lead.

Detection of human relatives.

Hell yeah.

What I do and that interests me

As Thanksgiving approaches: Native Americans (at least some of them) had domesticated turkeys.

I'm not surprised: Better livestock management leads to production and climate gains.

Makes you wonder: A doctor's experience with seed oils in his patients.

Magnificent art: The cell.

Cool new study: Women also hunted.

Question i ask

What are your plans for Thanksgiving?

Recipe corner

Time capsule

One year ago (November 7 - November 13)

Comment of the week

“Media Fast: News is like caramel corn - after the first bite, you keep eating. I have limited my exposure to the news - in fact since Covid started. The media moguls try to get us to hang on to their every word by telling us that every news segment is "Breaking News." This is not just "breaking news". It's their way of training our taste buds to come back for more or never to leave. We need to get away from television. You are so right. Our brain, body, mind need a break.

-Great analogy, Barbara.

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About the Author

Mark Sisson is the founder of Mark's Daily Apple, sponsor of the Primal food and lifestyle movement, and the New York Times bestselling author of The Keto Reset Diet. His latest book is Keto for Life, where he explains how he combines the keto diet with a Primal lifestyle for optimal health and longevity. Mark is also the author of many other books, including The primitive plan, which was credited with spurring the growth of the Primal / Paleo movement in 2009. After spending three decades researching and educating people on why food is the key to achieving and maintaining optimal well-being , Mark launched Primitive cuisine, an authentic food company that creates staples for Primal / Paleo, Keto, and Whole30 cuisine.

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It’s easy to get confused when it comes to health and alimentation. Even qualified experts often seem to hold opposing opinions. Yet, despite all the disagreements, a number of wellness tips are well supported by research. Here are 27 health and alimentation tips that are actually based on good technique.

These 8 practical tips cover the basics of healthy eating and can help you make healthier choices.

The key to a saine diet is to eat the right amount of kcal for how réactive you are so you balance the energy you consume with the energy you use.

If you eat or drink more than your body needs, you’ll put on weight because the energy you do not use is stored as fat. If you eat and drink too little, you’ll lose weight.

You should also eat a wide range of foods to make sure you’re getting a balanced diet and your body is receiving all the nutrients it needs.

It’s recommended that men have around 2, 500 kcal a day ( 10, 500 kilojoules ). Women should have around 2, 000 calories a day ( 8, 400 kilojoules ). Most adults in the UK are eating more calories than they need and should eat fewer calories.

Starchy carbohydrates should make up just over a third of the food you eat. They include potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and cereals. Choose higher fibre or wholegrain varieties, such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice or potatoes with their skins on.

They contain more fibre than white or refined starchy carbohydrates and can help you feel full for longer. Try to include at least 1 starchy food with each main meal. Some people think starchy foods are fattening, but gram for gram the carbohydrate they contain provides fewer than half the kcal of fat.

Keep an eye on the fats you add when you’re cooking or serving these types of foods because that’s what increases the calorie content – for example, oil on chips, butter on bread and creamy sauces on pasta.

It’s recommended that you eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and veg every day. They can be fresh, frozen, canned, dried or juiced. Getting your 5 A Day is easier than it sounds. Why not chop a banana over your breakfast cereal, or swap your usual mid-morning snack for a piece of fresh fruit ?

A portion of fresh, canned or frozen fruit and vegetables is 80g. A portion of dried fruit ( which should be kept to mealtimes ) is 30g. A 150ml glass of fruit juice, vegetable juice or smoothie also counts as 1 portion, but limit the amount you have to no more than 1 glass a day as these drinks are sugary and can damage your teeth.

You can choose from fresh, frozen and canned, but remember that canned and smoked fish can be high in salt. Most people should be eating more fish, but there are recommended limits for some types of fish.

You need some fat in your diet, but it’s important to pay attention to the amount and type of fat you’re eating. There are 2 main types of fat : saturated and unsaturated. Too much saturated fat can increase the amount of cholesterol in the blood, which increases your risk of developing heart disease.

On average, men should have no more than 30g of saturated fat a day. On average, women should have no more than 20g of saturated fat a day. Children under the age of 11 should have less saturated fat than adults, but a low-fat diet is not suitable for children under 5.

Try to cut down on your saturated fat intake and choose foods that contain unsaturated fats instead, such as vegetable oils and spreads, oily fish and avocados. For a healthier choice, use a small amount of vegetable or olive oil, or reduced-fat spread instead of butter, lard or ghee.

When you’re having meat, choose lean cuts and cut off any visible fat. All types of fat are high in energy, so they should only be eaten in small amounts.

Regularly consuming foods and drinks high in sugar increases your risk of obesity and tooth decay. Sugary foods and drinks are often high in energy ( measured in kilojoules or kcal ), and if consumed too often can contribute to weight gain. They can also cause tooth decay, especially if eaten between meals.

Free sugars are any sugars added to foods or drinks, or found naturally in honey, syrups and unsweetened fruit juices and smoothies. This is the type of sugar you should be cutting down on, rather than the sugar found in fruit and milk.

Many packaged foods and drinks contain surprisingly high amounts of free sugars.

More than 22. 5g of total sugars per 100g means the food is high in sugar, while 5g of total sugars or less per 100g means the food is low in sugar.

Eating too much salt can raise your blood pressure. People with high blood pressure are more likely to develop heart disease or have a stroke. Even if you do not add salt to your food, you may still be eating too much.

About three-quarters of the salt you eat is already in the food when you buy it, such as breakfast cereals, soups, breads and condiments. Use food labels to help you cut down. More than 1. 5g of salt per 100g means the food is high in salt.

Adults and children aged 11 and over should eat no more than 6g of salt ( about a teaspoonful ) a day. Younger children should have even less.

As well as eating healthily, regular exercise may help reduce your risk of getting serious health conditions. It’s also important for your overall health and wellbeing.

Read more about the benefits of exercise and physical activity guidelines for adults. Being overweight or obese can lead to health conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, heart disease and stroke. Being underweight could also affect your health.

Most adults need to lose weight by eating fewer kcal. If you’re trying to lose weight, aim to eat less and be more active. Eating a saine, balanced diet can help you maintain a healthy weight.

Check whether you’re a saine weight by using the BMI healthy weight calculator. Start the NHS weight loss plan, a 12-week weight loss guide that combines advice on healthier eating and physical activity. If you’re underweight, see underweight adults. If you’re worried about your weight, ask your GP or a dietitian for advice.

You need to drink plenty of fluids to stop you getting dehydrated. The government recommends drinking 6 to 8 glasses every day. This is in addition to the fluid you get from the food you eat. All non-alcoholic drinks count, but water, lower fat milk and lower sugar drinks, including tea and coffee, are healthier choices. Try to avoid sugary soft and fizzy drinks, as they’re high in kcal. They’re also bad for your teeth.

Even unsweetened fruit juice and smoothies are high in free sugar. Your combined total of drinks from fruit juice, vegetable juice and smoothies should not be more than 150ml a day, which is a small glass. Remember to drink more fluids during hot weather or while exercising.

Some people skip breakfast because they think it’ll help them lose weight. But a healthy breakfast high in fibre and low in fat, sugar and salt can form part of a balanced diet, and can help you get the nutrients you need for good health.

A wholegrain lower sugar cereal with semi-skimmed milk and fruit sliced over the top is a tasty and healthier breakfast. Further informationThe Eatwell Guide can help you get the right balance of the 5 main food groups. The guide shows you how much of what you eat should come from each food group. Read more about eating a balanced diet and understanding kcal.

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