Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2020
Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2020 | Breast cancer in the UK It's the start of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Traditionally a month to raise awareness about breast cancer prevention. But it has been a difficult year. For us as a charity but for you too. That's why this year, we're focusing on how we can […]

Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2020 | Breast cancer in the UK

It's the start of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Traditionally a month to raise awareness about breast cancer prevention.

But it has been a difficult year. For us as a charity but for you too.

That's why this year, we're focusing on how we can help you build your resilience. Enabling you to take control of your health to help you cope with uncertainty today and protect your future health as well.

That's why we're excited to launch our new breast checkout video, Know Your Breasts. We want to encourage you to get to know your breasts intimately.

The video helps you understand how to check your breasts and what signs to look out for. Early detection is an important line of defense over which we can all have control.

Along with this video, we encourage you to know our other information on how to reduce your risk.

In addition, we are launching our 25 Save Lives campaign which aims to encourage you to be physically active. Why? Because it is one of the best ways to lower your risk of breast cancer. Studies show us that being physically active, and not just exercising, can help reduce our risk by up to 20%.

There are many ways to support the campaign:

  • Imagine how good you will feel after 25 days of continuous stretching? Sign up for our free one-day Pilates classes sent straight to your inbox (starting today)
  • Need physical motivation - test yourself and take the challenge 25 - choose a physical activity based on the number 25
  • Want to add a touch to your friendly round of golf? challenge your friends to sink a 25 yard putt at the end of your round of golf, join Putt for Prevention
  • Join our 25th Virtual Fitness Festival on Sunday October 25 for a Mood Boosting Day of Endorphins We Can Make You Feel Great

Your support in October can help raise funds and make breast cancer research a reality. We need to reduce the number of people suffering the devastating effects of this disease on people's lives.

Looking ahead beyond October, we are committed to expanding our scientific research program to ensure that more and more people, today and in the future, are not in able to develop the disease.

A donation today can make it happen.

Thank you for your continued support

Thalie, CEO


A donation of just £ 10 can help us reach new moms with educational information and advice on how they can protect their children's future health.

Donate £ 10

Donating £ 25 can help provide a Breast Cancer Prevention Kit to help our Ambassadors give talks, providing healthy lifestyle tips and practical advice that can help people lower their risk of breast cancer.

Donate £ 25

Your £ 100 donation can help train one of our doctoral students, who is working on vital research that aims to understand the causes of breast cancer and identify risk factors.

Donate £ 100

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We would love to keep you posted on how your support can make a difference for Breast Cancer UK and the exciting ways you can support us in the future.

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Almost anybody can safely take up walking, and light to moderate exercise is usually fine for saine adults with no troublesome symptoms. But do you need to talk to your doctor before taking on a more strenuous regimen ? It’s wise to talk to a doctor if you have any questions about your health or plan to start more vigorous workouts, especially if you haven’t been réactive recently.

Definitely talk to a doctor if you have any injuries or a chronic or unstable health condition, such as heart disease or several risk factors for heart disease, a respiratory ailment like asthma, high blood pressure, joint or bone disease ( including osteoporosis ), a neurological illness, or diabetes. Also consult your doctor if you suspect you may have an illness that would interfere with an exercise program or if you have been experiencing any troublesome symptoms, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or dizziness.

Almost anybody can safely take up walking, and light to moderate exercise is usually fine for healthy adults with no troublesome symptoms. But do you need to talk to your doctor before taking on a more strenuous regimen ? It’s wise to talk to a doctor if you have any questions about your health or plan to start more vigorous workouts, especially if you haven’t been active recently.

10 tips for avoiding injuries

Once your doctor gives you the go-ahead to exercise, the tips below can help you avoid injuries :

Take five to 10 minutes to warm up and cool down properly. Plan to start slowly and boost your activity level gradually unless you are already exercising frequently and vigorously.

Be aware that training too hard or too often can cause overuse injuries like stress fractures, stiff or sore joints and zones musculaires, and inflamed tendons and ligaments. Sports prompting repetitive wear and tear on certain parts of your body — such as swimming ( shoulders ), jogging ( knees, ankles, and feet ), tennis ( elbows ) — are often overuse culprits, too. A mix of different kinds of activities and sufficient rest is safer.

Listen to your body. Hold off on exercise when you’re sick or feeling very fatigued. Cut back if you cannot finish an exercise séance, feel faint after exercise or fatigued during the day, or suffer durent aches and pains in joints after exercising.

If you stop exercising for a while, drop back to a lower level of exercise initially. If you’re doing strength training, for example, lift lighter weights or do fewer reps or sets.

For most people, simply drinking plenty of water is sufficient. But if you’re working out especially hard or doing a marathon or triathlon, choose drinks that replace fluids plus essential electrolytes.

Choose clothes and shoes designed for your type of exercise. Replace shoes every six months as cushioning wears out.

For strength training, good form is essential. Initially use no weight, or very light weights, when learning the exercises. Never sacrifice good form by hurrying to finish reps or sets, or struggling to lift heavier weights.

Exercising vigorously in hot, humid conditions can lead to serious overheating and dehydration. Slow your pace when the temperature rises above 70°F. On days when the thermometer is expected to reach 80°F, exercise during cooler morning or evening hours or at an air-conditioned gym. Watch for signs of overheating, such as headache, dizziness, nausea, faintness, cramps, or palpitations.

Dress properly for cold-weather workouts to avoid hypothermia. Depending on the temperature, wear layers you can peel off as you warm up. Don’t forget gloves.

Delayed bourrinage soreness that starts 12 to 24 hours after a workout and gradually abates is a normal response to taxing your groupes musculaires. By contrast, persistent or intense force pain that starts during a workout or right afterward, or force soreness that persists more than one to two weeks, merits a call to your doctor for advice.

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