Updated WIC food packages are associated with improvements in the diets and health of low-income, vulnerable infants and young children
In 2009, the USDA Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC), which promotes the health and nutrition of low-income pregnant and postpartum women, infants and children. under 5, updated the food packages provided to participants. . WIC's updated food packages have focused on balancing adequate intakes of nutrients and food groups while […]

In 2009, the USDA Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC), which promotes the health and nutrition of low-income pregnant and postpartum women, infants and children. under 5, updated the food packages provided to participants. . WIC's updated food packages have focused on balancing adequate intakes of nutrients and food groups while reducing the risk of obesity. Significant changes included removing juice and adding baby fruit and vegetable options to infant food packaging. Other changes include reducing amounts of juice, adding whole grain products and a cash benefit for purchasing fruits and vegetables, and switching from whole milk to low or fat free milk for children 2 years of age and over. However, information regarding the impact of these revisions to food packaging on infant and child feeding practices is limited.

To examine the association between WIC packet changes and diet quality, Joanne Guthrie (Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture) and colleagues used data from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study. from 2008 and 2016, a large national survey that examined the eating behaviors of infants. and children. Study data included 2,892 children aged 6 to 47.9 months in 2008 and 2,635 in 2016. Differences were analyzed based on WIC participation, survey year and age. of the child.

Study results published in The Nutrition Journal showed positive trends associated with changes in nutrient intakes and food consumption patterns of infants and children participating in WIC. In 2016, nearly 19% of infants had iron intakes below the estimated average needs, defined as a nutritional intake value estimated to meet the age-specific needs of half of healthy individuals, compared to 7.6 % in 2008. While 87% of WIC infants met the estimated average iron requirement, 69% of non-WIC infants did not. WIC infants were more likely to consume infant cereal, a good source of iron provided by their WIC food packaging. More WIC infants than non-WIC infants consumed vegetables daily in 2016 than in 2008. In 2016, compared to 2008, more WIC infants ate vegetables and baby fruit. In 2016, 47% of WIC preschoolers drank low fat milk, compared with 19% of non-WIC preschoolers.

These and other findings provide important information on changes in dietary intake over the past decade and provide insight into the extent to which changes in WIC food packaging are associated with improvements in diet and performance. the health of vulnerable low-income infants and young children. Recommendations for meeting the goals of the dietary recommendations include increased consumption of fruits, vegetables, foods rich in iron and whole grains, and a reduction in added sugars.

Reference Guthrie JF, Anater AS, Hampton JC, Catellier DJ, Eldridge AL, Johnson WL, Quann EE. The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children is associated with several changes in the nutritional intakes and food consumption patterns of participating infants and young children, 2008 compared to 2016. The Nutrition Journal, Volume 150, Number 11, November 2020, Pages 2985-2993, https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxaa265.

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Almost anybody can safely take up walking, and light to moderate exercise is usually fine for saine adults with no troublesome symptoms. But do you need to talk to your doctor before taking on a more strenuous regimen ? It’s wise to talk to a doctor if you have any questions about your health or plan to start more vigorous workouts, especially if you haven’t been réactive recently.

Definitely talk to a doctor if you have any injuries or a chronic or unstable health condition, such as heart disease or several risk factors for heart disease, a respiratory ailment like asthma, high blood pressure, joint or bone disease ( including osteoporosis ), a neurological illness, or diabetes. Also consult your doctor if you suspect you may have an illness that would interfere with an exercise program or if you have been experiencing any troublesome symptoms, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or dizziness.

Almost anybody can safely take up walking, and light to moderate exercise is usually fine for healthy adults with no troublesome symptoms. But do you need to talk to your doctor before taking on a more strenuous regimen ? It’s wise to talk to a doctor if you have any questions about your health or plan to start more vigorous workouts, especially if you haven’t been active recently.

10 tips for avoiding injuries

Once your doctor gives you the go-ahead to exercise, the tips below can help you avoid injuries :

Take five to 10 minutes to warm up and cool down properly. Plan to start slowly and boost your activity level gradually unless you are already exercising frequently and vigorously.

Be aware that training too hard or too often can cause overuse injuries like stress fractures, stiff or sore joints and muscles, and inflamed tendons and ligaments. Sports prompting repetitive wear and tear on certain parts of your body — such as swimming ( shoulders ), jogging ( knees, ankles, and feet ), tennis ( elbows ) — are often overuse culprits, too. A mix of different kinds of activities and sufficient rest is safer.

Listen to your body. Hold off on exercise when you’re sick or feeling very fatigued. Cut back if you cannot finish an exercise session, feel faint after exercise or fatigued during the day, or suffer persistent aches and pains in joints after exercising.

If you stop exercising for a while, drop back to a lower level of exercise initially. If you’re doing strength training, for example, lift lighter weights or do fewer reps or sets.

For most people, simply drinking plenty of water is sufficient. But if you’re working out especially or doing a marathon or triathlon, choose drinks that replace fluids plus essential electrolytes.

Choose clothes and shoes designed for your type of exercise. Replace shoes every six months as cushioning wears out.

For strength training, good form is essential. Initially use no weight, or very light weights, when learning the exercises. Never sacrifice good form by hurrying to finish reps or sets, or struggling to lift heavier weights.

Exercising vigorously in hot, humid conditions can lead to serious overheating and dehydration. Slow your pace when the temperature rises above 70°F. On days when the thermometer is expected to reach 80°F, exercise during cooler morning or evening hours or at an air-conditioned gym. Watch for signs of overheating, such as headache, dizziness, nausea, faintness, cramps, or palpitations.

Dress properly for cold-weather workouts to avoid hypothermia. Depending on the temperature, wear layers you can peel off as you warm up. Don’t forget gloves.

Delayed bourrinage soreness that starts 12 to 24 hours after a workout and gradually abates is a normal response to taxing your zones musculaires. By contrast, durent or soutenu force pain that starts during a workout or right afterward, or muscle soreness that persists more than one to two weeks, merits a call to your doctor for advice.

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