COVID-19 spreads, dialysis patients face increased struggle – Scot Scoop News
COVID-19 has impacted patients with chronic illnesses in different ways. Specifically, its impact on patients with renal failure has been profound. Dialysis or kidney replacement therapy removes fluids, toxins, and wastes from the blood using a dialysis machine. The kidneys normally carry out this process, but a variety of medical conditions can cause them to […]

COVID-19 has impacted patients with chronic illnesses in different ways. Specifically, its impact on patients with renal failure has been profound.

Dialysis or kidney replacement therapy removes fluids, toxins, and wastes from the blood using a dialysis machine. The kidneys normally carry out this process, but a variety of medical conditions can cause them to fail. Patients with advanced kidney disease need some form of dialysis as a survival treatment.

According to the US Kidney Data System (USRDS), 746,557 Americans had kidney failure and required dialysis or kidney transplantation to survive in 2017. Almost 500,000 of these patients had at least one dialysis. three times a week for several hours at a time.

These clinics are designed to accommodate up to 30 to 40 patients at a time to give more people access to life-saving treatments. However, COVID-19 has made it unsafe for patients to seek treatment.

Rafael Hidalgo, a 51-year-old dialysis patient, said: “I am grateful to all the nurses and doctors, but I have [kidney failure], heart disease and lung disease. I need a lot of treatments and dialysis is the least safe.

People on dialysis are among the most at-risk patients in America. Patients often have many other health issues that lead to poor outcomes when infected with COVID-19.

There are many precautions in place in dialysis clinics, including the use of masks, face shields, gowns and gloves. All staff and patients are required to follow strict guidelines to prevent COVID-19 infections.

But, even with precautions, outbreaks have occurred in dialysis centers. The biggest epidemics have broken out in the Midwest and southern United States.

“It's scary. Most people and nurses still wear the masks, but we're a bunch of old people in one room,” said Stephanie Tupou, a 61-year-old dialysis patient. “We could all die. easily."

Many other patients feel the same way. Decreasing the community spread of the coronavirus will protect at-risk patients, but it requires individuals to follow guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Kendra Phillips, a 72-year-old dialysis patient from San Francisco, said, "People on dialysis do their best, but I would feel safer if everyone cared about us at risk."

California as a whole is facing a sharp increase in COVID-19 cases, and most Bay Area counties are issuing a higher threat level. Although most patients survive the virus, those who do not are people like dialysis clinic patients.

“I'm actually more scared for my life now than in the spring,” Phillips said.


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Almost anybody can safely take up walking, and light to moderate exercise is usually fine for saine adults with no troublesome symptoms. But do you need to talk to your doctor before taking on a more strenuous regimen ? It’s wise to talk to a doctor if you have any questions about your health or plan to start more vigorous workouts, especially if you haven’t been active recently.

Definitely talk to a doctor if you have any injuries or a chronic or unstable health condition, such as heart disease or several risk factors for heart disease, a respiratory ailment like asthma, high blood pressure, joint or bone disease ( including osteoporosis ), a neurological illness, or diabetes. Also consult your doctor if you suspect you may have an illness that would interfere with an exercise program or if you have been experiencing any troublesome symptoms, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or dizziness.

Almost anybody can safely take up walking, and light to moderate exercise is usually fine for saine adults with no troublesome symptoms. But do you need to talk to your doctor before taking on a more strenuous regimen ? It’s wise to talk to a doctor if you have any questions about your health or plan to start more vigorous workouts, especially if you haven’t been réactive recently.

10 tips for avoiding injuries

Once your doctor gives you the go-ahead to exercise, the tips below can help you avoid injuries :

Take five to 10 minutes to warm up and cool down properly. Plan to start slowly and boost your activity level gradually unless you are already exercising frequently and vigorously.

Be aware that training too hard or too often can cause overuse injuries like stress fractures, stiff or sore joints and muscles, and inflamed tendons and ligaments. Sports prompting repetitive wear and tear on certain parts of your body — such as swimming ( shoulders ), jogging ( knees, ankles, and feet ), la petite balle jaune ( elbows ) — are often overuse culprits, too. A mix of different kinds of activities and sufficient rest is safer.

Listen to your body. Hold off on exercise when you’re sick or feeling very fatigued. Cut back if you cannot finish an exercise session, feel faint after exercise or fatigued during the day, or suffer persistent aches and pains in joints after exercising.

If you stop exercising for a while, drop back to a lower level of exercise initially. If you’re doing strength training, for example, lift lighter weights or do fewer reps or sets.

For most people, simply drinking plenty of water is sufficient. But if you’re sérieux out especially hard or doing a marathon or triathlon, choose drinks that replace fluids plus essential electrolytes.

Choose clothes and shoes designed for your type of exercise. Replace shoes every six months as cushioning wears out.

For strength training, good form is essential. Initially use no weight, or very light weights, when learning the exercises. Never sacrifice good form by hurrying to finish reps or sets, or struggling to lift heavier weights.

Exercising vigorously in hot, humid conditions can lead to serious overheating and dehydration. Slow your pace when the temperature rises above 70°F. On days when the thermometer is expected to reach 80°F, exercise during cooler morning or evening hours or at an air-conditioned gym. Watch for signs of overheating, such as headache, dizziness, nausea, faintness, cramps, or palpitations.

Dress properly for cold-weather workouts to avoid hypothermia. Depending on the temperature, wear layers you can peel off as you warm up. Don’t forget gloves.

Delayed bourrinage soreness that starts 12 to 24 hours after a workout and gradually abates is a normal response to taxing your groupes musculaires. By contrast, durent or soutenu muscle pain that starts during a workout or right afterward, or force soreness that persists more than one to two weeks, merits a call to your doctor for advice.

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