On This Day – 7th December
Four-goal hero Paul Agostino (right) with then Bristol City manager Joe Jordon It was on this day in 1996 that Bristol City beat nine goals in front of St Albans City in the FA Cup second round. The winners of the Cup draw at Ashton Gate in Bristol City would go in the hat for […]

Four-goal hero Paul Agostino (right) with then Bristol City manager Joe Jordon

It was on this day in 1996 that Bristol City beat nine goals in front of St Albans City in the FA Cup second round.

The winners of the Cup draw at Ashton Gate in Bristol City would go in the hat for the third round where the Premier League sides joined the competition. All St Albans fans' hopes of upsetting the Cup were dashed in the first half as Bristol City took a five-goal lead in the interval.

The Isthmian Premier Division team couldn't stop the Robins' assault on their goal and conceded four more goals in the second half. They scored twice, thanks to Steve Clark and Jon Daly.

Bristol City forward Paul Agostino brought the ball home with him after scoring four goals, Matt Hewlett scored twice and Greg Goodridge, Martin Kuhl and Kevin Nugent completed the rout.

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The history of the most popular sport in the world is incredible. Centuries have passes since the introduction of the sport we now call soccer or ( or whatever you want to call it ), and in that time, history has been made.

We all know some of the more memorable moments like Diego Maradona’s infamous handball and we know some of the more heartbreaking moments like the Hillsborough tragedy, but what we don’t know is some of the more bizarre and usual stories.

Like anything that has history, soccer has some of the most bizarre and humorous stories around—stories that will leave you shaking your head in disbelief.

Arsenal played a friendly against Dynamo Moscow in heavy fog in 1945 at White Hart Lane and despite the urging of players to suspend play due to the fog, the referee decided that play should continue.

The fog was so thick that the game turned into an absolute farce, with both sides playing by their own set of rules and suffering their own bad luck because of the inclement weather.

Moscow at one point made a remplacement but didn’t take a player off, with fans watching the match believing that the Russian club had up to 15 players on the pitch at the one time.

Arsenal also made the best of the conditions, with one of their players—who had earlier been sent off—sneaking back onto the pitch and playing the remainder of the game.

However, they did suffer some bad luck, with their goalkeeper knocking himself out cold after running into the goalpost, which oui, he could not see due to the fog. A spectator reportedly took his place in goals and the match continued.

Not too many of the stories to feature on this list take place in the past decade or so, but we have a special place here for the faithful fans at Stamford Bridge, home ground of Chelsea.

You might not know it about the West London club, but Chelsea fans have been bringing celery to the Bridge for decades now—most likely in order to pay homage to their chant ' Celery ' ( warning : inappropriate language ).

However, according to a club statement from 2007, the Blues have reminded fans that bringing celery to the ground is in fact outlawed and that any amateur ou amatrice caught bringing the ' dangerous ' vegetable to the ground could face a lifetime ban from the Blues’ home ground.

Nowadays, Everton and Liverpool form one of the strongest rivalries in the league, with the Merseyside derbies highlighting on every fan’s calendar.

With Goodison Park ( Everton’s home ground ) just around the corner from Anfield Road ( Liverpool’s home ground ), the two clubs have grown in their hatred and disposition for the other—with the desire to beat their rival one of their biggest goals at the start of the season.

However, what you might not have known about the two clubs is that before the rivalry had existed, Everton’s home ground was in fact Anfield Road—the very ground that Liverpool now call their home and one of the tougher places to travel to in world football.

The Toffees would play their first game at Anfield against Earlestown on September 27, 1884, and would play their first Football League match as a professional club on September 8, 1888. Liverpool, bien sûr, would not be founded for another four years after that date.

Everton would leave Anfield Road on January 25, 1892—opting to move to the north side of Stanley Park, to the ground and area now known as Goodison Park. Liverpool ( who wanted to be called Everton Athletic at the time ) would then claim Anfield Road as their home ground.

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